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Shock Wave Treatment

ORTHOTRIPSY

Orthotripsy for the Treatment of Chronic Plantar Fasciitis


PLANTAR FASCIITIS

Each year millions of Americans suffer from heel pain.  The typical symptom for this problem is severe pain upon first rising in the morning. Resting provides only temporary relief. The heel pain may get better, but usually returns. This intermittent pain often lasts all day.


Conventional treatment for this  painful problem includes: cortisone injections, use of custom made orthotics, over counter medication, physical therapy and stretching exercises. However, even with the treatments mentioned, the pain might still persist.  Some people might find relief with these treatments, however, the pain might come back.


Orthotripsy® is a non-invasive procedure for treatment of plantar fasciitis or heal pain.
The shock is applied to soft tissue of the heel, therefore increasing circulation to the area. This process initiates the body's natural healing process and in time decreases the inflammation of the fascia, decreasing pain and eventually eliminating it.


Orthotripsy is for patients who have had heel pain for at least six months and who have tried other methods for treating their heel pain without success. Orthotripsy is for patients who can tolerate anesthesia, as treatment would otherwise be painful.

 

Orthotripsy  Treatment      vs.       Surgery

- Non-invasive                                         - Invasive

- In office treatment                                 - Most commonly performed in surgery centers or hospital

- 25 minute treatment session                   - Procedure time 1-3 hours

- Less painful than surgery                        - Post-surgery pain treated with narcotics

- Zero to a few days recovery time             - 3-4 weeks recovery time

- Return to work same day                        - Time off from work for recovery

- High success rate                                   - High success rate if no complications

 

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